Suitable for adults

Are you a teacher that is interested in providing a fun activity for your students that helps them learn about model aviation? In this article, The Science Guy, Bill Kuhl, explains various ways that a pilot can modify their big foam towline glider so that it will fly properly.

This article includes a material list, tool list, written instructions and schematics for building a smoke tunnel. The activity was developed by Dwayne Hunt and Carol Galica of the NASA Glenn Research Center.

Rick Shertle, a contributing writer for MAKE magazine, explains the steps required to build a folding-wing glider. This is an activity that could be fun for students in a classroom setting, or even at home!

An all 3D printed Quadcopter, the MESArcFF program looks to create some new quad designs using the Autodesk 123D design software and their new Makerbots.
MESA

This project is part of a NASA grant for which the AMA has partnered with the Children’s Museum of Indianapolis. Jeff helped the National Model Aviation Museum build a scale model of Helios, which is a solar powered flying wing designed for NASA by AeroVironment, Inc. As Jeff worked to complete the project, he posted updates on a forum called “72nd Scale Aircraft”. The information in this article is copied directly as it was written by Jeff and appears on the forum.

Looking for a fun project? Try one of Flitetest's Speed Build Kits!

Are you interested in learning how to build the Glastonbury Meadowlark? Plans, instructions and photos are included in this article to help you successfully build this model.

The PowerUp 3.0, which was created by Shai Goitein, is a device that turns any paper airplane into a smartphone-operated drone. An instructional video that explains how to operate the PowerUp 3.0 is included in this article.

Charles Eide explains how to capture great aerial shots while flying your model aircraft. He also explains the importance of investing in quality equipment, flying line of sight, timing your flights and monitoring voltage, finding a helper, choosing a platform to fly on, framing your shot and investing in a good camera.

Although indoor glider events are simple, they are sometimes hard to master. Weight, strength, and aerodynamics are three issues that are very important when flying an indoor glider. Kurt Krempetz for AMA Glider will discuss these issues in this article.

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